Archive for the ‘Confidence’ Category

Junior Golf: 2016 is Your Year!

2016 is your year

Enjoy the New Year this way… Prioritize your time, make your Plan, and Practice your skills.

Without a plan, the people will perishSuccess comes to those who plan for it – the only things standing between your golfer and success are his priorities, his plans, and his practice.

Are you ready for great golf in 2016?

Sit down today, take out a calendar go to April 1, 2016, and write down his 3-month goal (Note, this is his goal, not yours. Ownership is everything when considering the success or failure of a project).

Then work backwards from there and write in the skills he needs to perfect in order to be on target for the said goal and the dates he needs to have them improved by. An example is, my 3-month April 1st goal is an improved short game. I need to chip better by February 15. I need to putt better by March 31st.

Now factor in what he must do each week to make his improvement attainable. “I commit to 30-45 minutes of skills-practice a minimum of three days each week.” This practice is in addition to his regular driving range time. The emphasis here is on his commitment, with your encouragement!

Be sure to customize the weekly practice according to the age and goal of your golfer. Remember… FUN is key to your golfer loving the game but practice will ensure perfecting it!

Have fun and enjoy the time spent with your golfer… these are memories worth making!

See you on #1 Tee… Linda

Junior Golf: Gratitude-A Winning Attitude

Tomorrow is Thanksgiving and in today’s Wednesday Waggle we will look at how imagegratitude becomes a winning attitude. The pros take nothing for granted and certainly they all must in some respect be thankful, grateful, thrilled or just really glad they are able to play a sport they dearly love.

Real-life example: S3 was playing in a junior golf tournament in Kerrville, Texas,
and he was entering his freshman year in high school and 1 member of his group was a high school senior. Well, the senior was playing pretty well and hit a couple of bad shots. As the senior’s frustration was becoming more apparent-read anger, his Dad yelled out, “You don’t have any reason to be upset. You’re on a beautiful golf course playing the game you love!” Now whether or not this was coaching, I really didn’t care. It was a classic and intelligent statement that said, appreciate and be grateful for the times when you are in a great place doing something you genuinely enjoy!

Understand that competition puts a different stress level on your daughter, but remember that she with the shortest memory is the 1 who starts hitting good shots sooner rather than later. It’s hard for adults to be grateful all the time so realize that it’s just as hard or harder for your kids. Parents, 1 of our most important roles is to be encouragers for our kids. So have your daughter look around and see the beauty around her on the golf course. Enjoy the birds, fish, butterflies and in the South, even the alligators. Here in Central Texas we have deer everywhere and also plenty of wild turkeys and feral hogs. Golf is a sport that takes you into nature and some courses have more nature than others. Yes, she needs to focus on her game but she also needs to appreciate where she is and how privileged she is to be there.image

Gratitude is a thankful appreciation for what an individual receives, whether tangible or intangible. Scientists have even noted that gratitude is associated with improved health.
As noted in an article on this topic published in the Harvard Mental Health Letter, “expressing thanks may be one of the simplest ways to feel better:” Dr. P. Murali Doraiswamy, head of biologic psychology at Duke University Medical Center once stated that: “If [thankfulness] were a drug, it would be the world’s best-selling product with a health maintenance indication for every major organ system.” So science is coming on board with gratitude/thankfulness having definite health benefits. So Parents, you know what you need to do, thankfully, of course.

See you on #1 tee, looking grateful… Happy Thanksgiving… Sam

Junior Golf: Winning Course Strategy

imageIn today’s Monday Mulligan we will take a look a winning course strategy that you and your son can use during every round of golf he plays. The pros dissect golf courses in great detail so they can have a strategic plan to effectively work their way around the course. (photo jennleforge.com)

Knowing what shot to hit and where you want it to end up is very important in order to win golf tournaments. The pros study their next tournament course in great detail and I don’t know exactly what they do or how they do it. What I do know is some elementary basic things that you and your son can start doing at virtually any skill level that can help him learn how to have a plan to attack a golf course and can help build his confidence during a round.

The ultimate goal is to shoot the lowest score possible. Part of the plan to do that is to study the course ahead of time and figure out what club to hit on every tee box and where you want the ball to end up in order to be in a good position to hit an effective next shot. Many courses have yardage books that give yardages between, from and to various points on each hole. This can include tee boxes, greens, bunkers, hazards, etc. A yardage book can be a valuable asset. Buy 1 if available, they are usually $5-$10. A practice round and range finder along with a yardage book are more than sufficient for any junior golfer to be able to “plan out” each hole.

Another benefit of having a strategy for playing a course is that it will give confidence to your son. Confidence can fluctuate during the 18 holes and every small thing to help build confidence ahead of the round is important.

Here are 2 things you can do with a junior golfer of any skill level, even a 6 or 7 year old. Look at the very first shot they will hit. If it is a progressive start-read tee times, ask if your son is starting on #1 or #10. The 2 of you decide what club he should hit based on what the 2nd shot on the hole requires. Have your son hit that 1st shot on the range before he tees off. If it is a shotgun start, find out what hole he starts on and take the same approach as above. The 2nd thing your son can do is find the 1st par 3 he will play. Determine what club he will hit and where he would like the ball to end up. Practice this shot on the range as well. Just practicing these 2 shots can do wonders for your son ‘s confidence during his round. Even the pros will tell you they are a bit nervous on #1 tee and while they would love to hit a great shot, they will be pleased with a decent shot, in play, with an OK leave for their next shot. Proper preparation is a big deal. (photo tomkitedesign.com)

imageReal-life example: S3 and I played a practice round at the beautiful Comanche Trace Golf Club in Kerrville, Texas, to prepare for a US Amateur Qualifier. There was a short par 3 that had the potential to be particularly deceptive. Prevailing winds would be helping from tee to green, but you could only tell if the wind was blowing by looking at the balconies of condos behind the green. The green itself was way downhill in a hole and was shaped running from about 11:00o’clock to 5:00 o’clock. However the back left ⅓ of the green sloped downhill into a water hazard. So the miss on this green was center to right and mercifully the pin placement was front right instead of back left. Understand how easy it could be to hit too much club, or pull a shot to the back left or have a strong wind blowing behind you that you could not feel or be aware of and suddenly you have an easy-looking tee shot over the green in a water hazard. Dad and Mom, this stuff happens to the pros and it can and will happen to your junior golfer or a member of his group. Yes, it’s golf.

See you on #1 tee looking confident… Sam

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