Posts Tagged ‘Decision-making’

Junior Golf: A Different Kind Of Golf Story

 

img_0135-1

Photocredit:jennleforge.com

In this Monday Mulligan we will look at a different kind of golf story. I’ve not written about this before but it seems now is an appropriate time.

On September 11, 2001, I was in the men’s lounge at The Dominion Country Club, near San Antonio, Texas, eating breakfast prior to a 9:00am tee time. It was to be a glorious day enjoying a fine golf course with 2 dear friends, Ron and Jim. As we watched the events taking place on the tv, Jim, a retired Special Agent for the FBI, needed about 1 second to say: “That’s no accident, that’s on purpose. It’s probably a terrorist attack.”

Jim and I first met in the 1970’s and we spent a lot of quality time together. His exceptional talents and skills needed no additional support, so terrorism it was. And of course, he was correct.

We decided to keep our tee time and try to play. After 9 holes we decided that our hearts and minds were somewhere other than the golf course and we walked off the 9th green and headed our separate ways. For the 3 of us at least, it wasn’t a day for golf.

IMG_0561

Photocredit:i.pinimg.com

Parents, the take home point today is that while there are few things better than playing golf, there are times when it is best to do something else. Life is full of highs and lows and some of the lows are so tough, so different, so once-in-a-lifetime, that it is just not possible to focus on anything, particularly our beloved sport.

 

Learning to differentiate between not feeling 100%, not being in the mood or having a runny nose and something truly devastating can be tougher than you’d expect. Playing hurt is part of sports and some athletes are better at it than others and certainly you never want to risk aggravating the injury or risking permanent damage to your child, but there are decisions to be made. To play or not to play, that is the question!

Linda and I were always wanting to give our kids the benefit of the doubt, in both directions. Frankly, in our house, if our kids could walk and breathe, they wanted to play, particularly in competition. And you know what, sometimes we let them and sometimes we didn’t. We had to make decisions and you’ll have to make some too. Please prepare!

See you on #1 tee with decisions made… Sam

 

 

Advertisements

Junior Golf: What Is This?

In this Monday Mulligan please take a look at the photo below and see if you can figure out what it is. This is a beautiful visual example of a very valuable educational opportunity for your son/daughter.

img_0135-1

Photocredit:jennleforge.com

Perhaps you recall the great line by the Guardian of The Holy Grail in Indiana Jones and The Last Crusade, “He chose poorly.” More contemporary golf lines might be, “He went for the hero shot and didn’t make it,” or “He should have taken his bogey medicine.” Whatever line you prefer, the poor result is the same.

This is, of course, a screenshot of the path of Jason Day’s golf ball on the 18th hole during the 3rd round of the recent PGA Championship. Jason’s unfathomable choice for his 2nd shot destroyed any chance to get off the hole with a bogey, 5 and then put him in a situation where he ended up with a quadruple bogey-8, which included a crushing 3-putt.

On the 18th tee box, a par or bogey would have kept him in a decent position to make a run for the win on Sunday. Golf truths you may hear: “Sometimes you have to take your bogey medicine.” “There are times when a bogey is a good score.” “Not even the pros execute every hero shot.” Jason chose to hit right when the hole and accessible fairway were to the left. It appeared that hitting a shot back in play to the fairway on his left was not a tough shot and that choice might have given him a decent bogey chance.

IMG_1008

 

Golf is not about hitting a great shot every time. It is about believing that you can hit a great shot every time. The nitty-gritty is all about how your youngster responds to a poor shot. It’s tough. It’s frustrating. It’s maddening. It’s golf. There is always a better choice, but one must choose to take it!

See you on #1 tee ready to make good choices… Sam

Junior Golf: 2 Truths About Choices

In this Wednesday Waggle we will look at another concept that is critical for success on behalf of your junior golfer.

img_0102-1

Photocredit:golfdigest.com

 

There are a number concepts that we, as parents, need to make certain that we encourage our children to embrace. Today Linda and I want to discuss the concept/thought process that in every situation there are choices and they come with 2 important revelations.

There are always choices! Every day we are all bombarded by choices, hundreds of them and it’s the same for your children as it is for Dad and Mom. Perhaps the choice is as simple as Shakespeare’s, “To be or not to be, that is the question.”, as spoken by Prince Hamlet. Although a bit heavy in content, Hamlet was still contemplating a choice. Sometimes the choice is as simple as do it or don’t do it, yes or no. Other times there are 2 or more options. Do I choose A, B or C? This 1st point is that your son/ daughter must grasp the fact that they always have a choice.


There is always a better choice!
Choices are not equal. Some have more risk. Some are more expensive or time-consuming. Some are healthier. And some are better than others, many times, much, much better.

So what does this look like in a golf tournament? Your boy hits his tee shot in the right rough. There is a tree between him and the green. His choices are several. He can select from trying to go over the tree, or going under the lower limbs of the tree or hitting 90-degrees straight back into a good lie in the middle of the fairway, but not really advancing the ball. We’re not going deep into strategy here, just pointing out that there are choices.

Also your girl might be looking at a tee shot where her best angle for the next shot would be to carry over some water down the right side of the fairway. There is room along the left side, but the approach angle is not as good. This is classic risk/reward, but she does have a choice.

image

Photocredit:readytomanage

As simple as this concept about choices is, we feel it needs to be discussed and encouraged more than it is. Another very important choice for your child is: “Do I study for my upcoming test? If so, do I study a little or a lot?” This is a decision where the results may determine scholastic eligibility and in our house, grades were always 1st before golf and everything else. It’s still a choice, in this case, 3 options.

Parents, if you will please slow down for just a day or 2 and consciously pay attention to how many choices you are constantly facing, I believe the sheer mass of the numbers will be stunning. Please remember that your junior golfer is facing in his/her own way a similar number of decisions to make.

When S3 started driving the very last thing I said to him as he was leaving the house was to remind him, “Son, please make good choices/decisions because you know what they are.” And I still say that today.

See you on #1 tee ready to make some good golf decisions… Sam

 

 

%d bloggers like this: