Posts Tagged ‘Golf scholarships’

Junior Golf: The First Step To College Golf

In this Friday Flop Shot we will look at how to make that 1st move, that first step down the path to college golf. Every plan must have a beginning, so here we go.

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photocredit:Dubai Golf

Your son/daughter has a family team with them as they pursue their junior golf career. Sisters and brothers are also part of the team even though their responsibilities may be more subtle than Dad and Mom’s. The whole family is the team.

What is a team’s number one function: to provide support for the player! The support starts right here. The road to college golf begins right here. The team must all be on the same page!

How do you begin?
First Mom and Dad must agree that you would like/expect your junior golfer to attend college.
Then you should look at the time and money involved in supporting your junior golfer’s career in a strong enough manner to promote him/her as golf scholarship material. Expect college to cost more than you ever imagined. S3’s golf scholarship money was extremely helpful in paying for his college expenses!


Parents you must then be in agreement that college golf will be the long-term goal of your kiddo’s junior golf career.

Next it’s time to bring your junior golfer on board that he is expected to go to college and the most fun way to attend would be as a scholarship golfer and that the family will support him in every way to help him get there. He must also do his part however, because this is a 2-way street.


Now bring the siblings on board
. Please make sure they know that you will support them in their endeavors every bit as much as you will support your young golfer. Their main role is to do their own thing without disrupting other family events and functions. They don’t need to be cheerleaders, they just need to go with the flow.

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This will get you started. There will be a ton of questions. Single parents please seek wise counsel. Talk to parents who have had scholarship athletes and get their input. Parents of other junior golfers may have some decent advice. Talk to people whose advice you respect and trust. Get as much information as you can. College scholarships are a big deal and are well worth the time you spend pursuing them.

Not every kiddo needs to attend college, but those who are talented high school athletes are different. They have a chance to go to college and have some of those costs paid for by the university they will attend. This is unique and special. Please accept this as so. Having a scholarship can, for some kids, be the difference in going, or not going, to college.

And Parents, getting a college degree is a life goal and going to school on a golf scholarship is an even higher life goal! So please get your whole crew on board and let’s get started on the path to college golf.

See you on #1 tee playing for a scholarship… Sam

Junior Golf: A Parent’s Vision

In today’s Wednesday Waggle we will look at what Dad and Mom see when they consider your son’s junior golf experience. What is your vision for your son?img_0102
The full definition of vision is: a : the act or power of imagination, b (1) : mode of seeing or conceiving (2) : unusual discernment or foresight <a person of vision> c : direct mystical awareness. (Dufner photo golfdigest.com)
For now let’s look at vision as the act or power of imagination. In other words, when you close your eyes and consider your son’s junior golf career, what do you see? Yes, the possibilities are endless, but let me offer a couple of tips that may help with your focus and direction.
Help your youngster set some goals. These must be divided into short-term and long-term items. Examples of short -term goals would be practicing 3 days a week, playing twice a week, entering tournaments, making the club, junior high or high school golf team.
Long-term goals can also include some of the short-term goals depending on your son’s age and skill level. Our #1 long-term goal was ALWAYS to attend college on a golf scholarship, always be scholastically eligible and get his undergraduate degree on time!image
S3 started playing golf when he was 5 years old and as soon as he made it clear that he enjoyed golf and wanted to pursue a junior golf career, Linda and I explained the college goal. He was probably 6 or 7 years old at the time. While there is always pressure associated with any goal, S3 bought in totally and we all agreed to have FUN pursuing this goal. So we turned the pressure around and used it as fuel.
Mom and Dad I want to assure you that 1 of the greatest adventures of your life is joining your son on his junior golf endeavor! It is just so much fun! Highs and lows. Beautiful weather and horrible weather. It all adds up to years of wonderful memories that cannot be bought for any price!
And the moment of moments, the amazing end to this chapter of all our lives was when, after walking his college stage and receiving his diploma, on time and being eligible to play golf all 4 years…seeing S3 in the courtyard in his cap and gown and he saw me and said with tears in his eyes, “I did it, Dad!” And I said, “Yes, Son you sure did and I am so proud of you!” Parents, this is a lifetime moment like no other! 17 years of junior golf and college golf combining to achieve that long-term goal that seemed
light-years away when it was first discussed. Wow, how the time flew by!
Please get your vision going and ask your son to share his vision with you. Work together for a common vision, 1 you are all comfortable with. Now you can set a course full steam ahead.
See you on #1 tee with a vision for the future… Sam

Junior Golf : More No Pass No Play

imageIn today’s Wednesday Waggle we will take a look at some aspects of no pass no play that are not so obvious. To restate from my previous post, time management for your junior golfer is a big deal and the sooner you get your daughter on a solid time management structure or at least starting the process, the better off she will be. (photo golfdigest.com)

We are in Texas and npnp is a reality for our kids. It may not be in your state, but now is the time to find out. Just call any high school, ask almost any public school teacher or coach or athletic department. If it is not required in your state, act like it is. Putting grades first is a big deal and while playing in competition should not be promoted as a reward for decent grades, in reality it is. And npnp is in effect in all colleges, at least NCAA affiliates. This is a lifetime skill. Proper time management and prioritization are vital to your daughter’s success.

Homeschool kids in Texas have a unique situation and 1 which I am not totally clear on. Some public schools can now allow some homeschoolers within their school district geography to participate in varsity sports. I think this is great! What I am not clear on is how homeschooled kids are held accountable for making npnp grades. There must be something for it to be fair to regular public school students, who have a gpa standard to meet. The opportunity for homeschooled kids to play varsity sports at public school is wonderful and I am proud of my state for allowing this. Again check this out with a public school district before you get too excited. I just heard about this a few days ago and I think this is a very new law.

Here’s a perfect example of why grades matter. Let’s say there are 10 girls on your daughter’s high school golf team. And your daughter is consistently 1 of the top 3 players and there are really only 4 girls, including your daughter who can play competitively in tournaments. Now if 1 of the 6 girls who do not play at a high skill level ends up being scholastically ineligible, it’s sad, but not likely to impact the team’s results in a tournament.

Here’s why. In high school and in college tournaments 5 people on each team play and the low 4 scores are the ones that count. So the high score is not used. Out of 71, 73, 75, 76 and 85, the 85 does not count and the total for that round would be 295. 1 player on your daughter’s team can have a poor round. Now if your daughter or 1 of the other top girls doesn’t make her grades, her team has little chance of being competitive. One of the lesser-skilled girls would need to have a great round, which can and does happen but cannot be counted on. So if your daughter does not keep her gpa up she is letting down the team and frankly, really it is not good and can and will be interpreted by some as being a selfish act, being lazy about grades. Sure there can be a course or teacher that is just really a pain, but tutors are available and sometimes your daughter will need to spend extra effort on her gpa in addition to her golf. Yes, time management.

To keep priorities straight, in high school S3 almost always had 1 or more kids ineligible all the time, both guys and girls. Frankly these were usually kids who were lazy about golf and apparently lazy about grades too. Now in 3.5 years, 7 semesters of college golf at an NCAA Division II school, I think he has had maybe 1 guy and 1 girl scholastically ineligible for 1 grading period, total.image

To be clear S3 has always been scholastically eligible and it is a tiebreaker point when you put on your resume to college coaches that you, rather, your daughter has always been scholastically eligible throughout her high school career. Mom and Dad, colleges want daughters and sons who will make their grades, period. And my little, personal survey is a decent example. College student-athletes, for the most part are motivated and are going to have good grades. Set your daughter up to succeed and get good time management habits started today.

See you on #1 tee looking timely and organized… Sam

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