Posts Tagged ‘Instruction’

JuniorGolf: The Olympics

In this Friday Flop Shot we will look at an amazing 17-day stretch where you and your son can watch the world’s greatest athletes compete on the biggest stage of all! (photo offcoursegolf.com)img_0106-1

Yes, it’s Olympics time. The opening ceremony is tonight and knowing Brazil’s flair for extravagant celebrations, I think we should expect a very colorful and entertaining evening. Some of the events have already started due to necessary timing between contests. Women’s soccer started Wednesday and the well-deserved #1 seed US Women’s Soccer Team took care of New Zealand 2-0 and have their next game against France at 3:00pm, central time, tomorrow, on DirecTv, channel 220. The men’s soccer started yesterday however the lackluster US Men’s Soccer Team didn’t even qualify for the top 16 teams to make the Olympic competition.

There are so many reasons for you and your son and your whole family to watch this competition that I can’t begin to list them in today’s post. For now let me try to get you revved up a bit. (photo krcrtv.com)image

You absolutely must watch Michael Phelps, the most decorated Olympic athlete of ALL-TIME! This is his 4th Olympics and even though is is like 1,000 years-old in swimmer’s years, he will certainly be the man to beat in every race he is in. I’m encouraging you that this man has one of the fiercest wills to win of anyone you will ever see. This is a must watch, yes, even more so than golf. These are Michael Phelps’ last competitive races ever against the best swimmers in the world and so expect an amazing result!

In a different vein, women’s gymnastics is regarded as the most highly-rated, in TV viewership, of all the sports and the US brings a strong contingent. This is always beautiful and amazing to watch. Here’s a 5-minute video of 1 of the great Olympic moments of all-time. If you don’t know who Kerri Strug is, you will after watching this. Get fired up!

Olympic golf starts with the men on August 11, followed by the women on August 17th, all on The Golf Channel. More on that as we get closer. In the meantime, get that TiVo going. NBC has coverage on NBC, The Golf Channel, Bravo, CNBC, MSNBC, NBCSN, USA Network and specialty channels for basketball and soccer and is streaming EVERY event live on the web on NBCOlympics.com and on the NBC Sports app. NBC has exclusive rights so find out where these channels are on your provider and get prepared!

See you on #1 tee looking ready for The Olympics… Sam

Junior Golf: Unexpected Results

In today’s Friday Flop Shot we will look at unexpected results, what happens when your son’s round of golf doesn’t look anything like you thought it would or should, or what we, his team, were expecting.img_0106

A perfect example is yesterday’s 1st round results at the PGA Championship. 2 of the biggest favorites will need to have a great round today or miss the cut. Rory McIlroy had a 4-over par 74, with 35 putts. Please note that most tour pros would love to average 27-28 putts per round, or less, so 35 is horrible. Now Dustin Johnson, winner or 2 events in a row not that long ago blew up to a 77, what’s up with that? (photo offcoursegolf.com)

Along with Jordan Spieth, Jason Day, Bubba Watson, Ricky Fowler, these were most of the top names being picked to win the 4th major of 2016. Let’s see, Jimmy Walker and Martin Kaymer, who are they again? Well, Martin has won 2 majors and Jimmy has won 5 times in the previous 2 years, but neither has had a lot going on this year. How is Jimmy leading and how is Martin tied for 4th with Henrik among others, after 1 round?

Jimmy said he grew up playing a Tillighast course, I think referring to our wonderful Brackenridge Park Golf Course, Old Brack, here in San Antonio. The big greens, generous fairways and bunker placements were familiar to him. Folks, the pros favor some courses over others and pleasing to the eye, familiarity, acceptability of their preferred shot shape, etc are big deals. It’s a bonus to Jimmy that a course in a major feels comfortable to him. (Jimmy Walker photo pga.com)

PGA: PGA Championship - First Round

Jul 28, 2016; Springfield, NJ, USA; Jimmy Walker reacts to the crowd after making a putt on 17th hole during the first round of the 2016 PGA Championship golf tournament at Baltusrol GC – Lower Course. Mandatory Credit: Eric Sucar-USA TODAY Sports

And Martin Kaymer, in majors he’s either really on or really off and if it’s an on week for him, look out. He can get in a serious zone. Let’s not forget Henrik Stensen, winner of The Open Championship 2 weeks ago, he’s and Martin are only 2 shots back. No disrespect to the other players in the top 10 after round 1, but you can look up the complete leaderboard online.

What does this mean to you and your junior golfer? Competitive sports is tough, it’s like life, things happen! Good things and bad things happen and many cannot be readily explained. It’s getting back up to hit another shot that counts. Believing that the next shot will be a good shot counts even more! I can assure you that there were times S3 looked like he was ready to cry, faint or throw up after hitting a bad shot or having a bad hole. Sometimes he got over it on the next tee box and sometimes it took a few holes, but he got over it during the round, usually finishing with a strong final 3 holes, at least.

Being an encourager is 1 of the most important roles for a parent. Remember that just because your son has been playing great recently does not mean he will play great in his next event. The encouragement must be that nobody plays great all the time, but he, your son, must believe he can hit a good shot after hitting a poor 1. Positive, positive, positive! If you get knocked down, you get back up. Forget the bad, focus on the good.

Let’s enjoy this great golf weekend! The Women’s Open Championship is in progress and of course we have the rest of the Men’s PGA Championship. Get the TiVo going!

See you on #1 tee expecting good shots… Sam

Junior Golf: More Stretching=Better Golf

imageIn this Wednesday Waggle we’ll see how more stretching equals better golf. Yes, your daughter is as nimble and flexible as a piece of string, but she will benefit from proper stretching. The best golf is a result of many things including a body that is properly stretched out. Tight muscles just cannot get into the proper positions to execute good swings.

Even with the innate agility that comes with youth, your daughter still needs to start investigating a solid stretching, strength and conditioning program. The easiest to implement is the stretching because it requires no special equipment or clothing. 40 years ago the only guy doing anything remotely resembling these things was Gary Player. Look at him today. He looks great and can allegedly outwalk the young pros on tour! It’s no accident. His years of extra conditioning work have really paid off. (Jason Duffner photo from golfdigest.com)

Where do you start with the stretches? Our family has a series of stretches that have helped 100% of the folks we know have properly used them. These were given to me by an orthopedic surgeon 20 years ago when my lower back was knotted-up. They are designed to stretch pretty much everything on your back side from the base of your skull to your Achilles’ tendon. And with a knotted-up lower back, I was pain-free and better than normal after 16 days of doing these stretches 2x daily. Now they are an integral part of my fitness regimen. And they stretch the quads and calves too!image

Today virtually everyone on the PGA/LPGA has some sort of fitness routine. The competition demands it. Sometimes kids take more readily to new things if they are fun, so here are 2 stretching situations that you can certainly make “fun” to your daughter. It is just plain “fun” to watch Miguel Ángel Jiménez do his brief stretches on the driving range. They are quick and easy, but they may not be the only warmups he does. Find a video and go for it. (photo from i.ytimg.com)

Another great video from The Golf Channel, I’m sorry I don’t remember the specific show: is one of the guest instructors showing quick stretches to do when your daughter is late getting to #1 tee and there is no time for formal routines. It is great and it takes just a minute or 2.

See you on #1 tee…and your daughter better be stretched-out and ready to play… Sam

College Bound Tip #2 for Parents of Junior Golfers – Persistence

As I mentioned in part one, college bound tips #1 and #2 are must haves for families where the Junior Golfer is considering playing college golf!  We call them the Two P’s and without them the odds of your child playing college golf are slim to none.

So Parents, “Fasten your seatbelts!”  The second P is Persistence-as in your persistence to relentlessly do the behind-the-scenes work necessary for your junior golfer’s success.

Persistence, as defined by the Urban Dictionary, is to be unrelenting, someone who never gives up. Ceaseless.Sam Goldfarb III signing with TAMIU

Yes, to use some old show business terminology, your child is the show and you are the go.  You, Mom, Dad, Grandma, Grandpa, Aunt or Uncle are the ones who must always be there for your Junior Golfer.

Taking care of the details required to pursue junior golf takes some getting used to, but depending on your attitude it can be a lot of fun.

Your responsibilities include:

1.  Encouraging your child to make good grades-no pass, no play starts in high school if not earlier

2.  Providing the funding for proper clothing, equipment, range fees, green fees and tournament entry fees

3.  Researching and scheduling the tournaments in your area and getting your kiddo’s entries in on time

4.  Driving or arranging transportation to and from practices and events

5.  Confirming with your Junior Golfer that you and the whole family support their efforts

6.  Taking on all the behind-the-scene organizational details so your Junior Golfer only needs to focus on scholastics and golf

7.  Immersing your kiddo in the wonderful world of junior golf by setting up as many practices and tournaments as your wallet and their psyche can handle

Together, the Two P’s – Passion & Persistence, give your Junior Golfer a great start down the road to college golf.

Let’s get out there and play some golf… Sam

College Bound Tip #1 for Parents of Junior Golfers

Sam Goldfarb III

Sam Goldfarb III

These college bound tips #1 and #2 are must haves for families where your Junior Golfer is considering playing college golf!  We call them the Two P’s and without them the odds of your child playing college golf are slim to none.

The first P is where it all starts-passion-as in your child’s passion for the game of golf.  

Passion, as defined by the Urban Dictionary, is: when you put more energy into something than is required to do it. It is more than just enthusiasm or excitement, passion is ambition that is materialized into action to put as much heart, mind body and soul into something as is possible.

Does the above definition sound like your Junior Golfer?

Does your child have passion for the sport of golf?  Is he or she asking to go hit balls or play a few holes before it gets dark?  Are they practicing putting on the carpet or hitting whiffle balls in the back yard?  Is golf their default setting when it comes to exercise and outdoor activities?  Are they willing to commit to the hours of physical and mental work that are required to get their game good enough to be considered for college golf? If the answer is “yes” to these questions, then your kiddo may very well have a passion for this great game.

Please understand that every youngster who enjoys golf does not have a passion for it.  Some kiddos are content with hitting balls every now and then and playing a round of golf with Mom or Dad maybe once a month or so.  This is still a great thing!  You have a child who enjoys a “sport for life” and who likes going out and spending 4 or 5 hours with you on a beautiful golf course!  Quality time on a golf course with family members is one of the great joys of life!

And some kiddos may begin with a casual interest in golf that can end up being a passion for golf.  Please be excited if your child enjoys any aspect of golf.  Be an encourager and see what happens.  We have seen countless examples of junior golfers who have grown in their passion for the game!

So, does your child have a passion for golf?  If you believe so, then the next P is on you.  Yes Dad and Mom, Grandpa and Grandma, it is all on you and all about you.  What is it?  You’ll find out in the next installment, tip #2.

Getting Started in Junior Golf Made Easy – part 2

Welcome back!

I’ll share from Linda and I that we are truly enjoying the opportunity to share with you our experience as golf-parents. Our road has been a long and adventurous one and we are so glad to help you in any way we can. Shoot us an email with any questions or concerns and we will get back with you ASAP thegoldfarbs@parentingjuniorgolfers.com

Be sure to check out our previous post for part 1, which includes tips 1-5.

6.  Get an eye exam.  Golf demands excellent vision at all distances.  You would not believe how many juniors had no idea they needed vision help until they had an eye exam. We want our JG to start off on his or her best foot right from the beginning.

7.  Get a general physical exam.  Golf has its own types of physical requirements – a lot of walking for sure, carrying a golf bag, dealing with heat and cold, as well as the everyday stress and strain of growing up. You certainly want to know if your JG has any physical issues that need to be addressed before he or she gets out on the course.

8.  Buy a cap or hat.  These keep hair and the sun out of the eyes and sweat off of the forehead. You have so many styles to choose from, visors, floppies, wide-brim, flat-brim, baseball caps, or cowboy hats – if it works for your JG it will work in the game.

9.  Corrective lenses.  If your kiddo wears corrective lenses, you will want to discuss with their eye doctor the best lenses to fit them with for a combination of these types of vision needs:

  • distance-so they can see where their shots go,
  • close up-3 to 4 feet so they can clearly see the ball at address
  • close up wide view-in other words a big field of view so the ball stays in the same vision plane on their lens when they make a swing-if the head moves during the swing, the ball can go in and out of the vision plane and this is very distracting.

10.  Lessons and practice.  Please refer to our post on 7 Tips to Finding Your Best Golf Coach. 

11. Be a Junior Golf Encourager for your kiddo!  Your excitement and enjoyment of the game will be   contagious.

If your young person is not “on fire” for golf right now, be encouraged by this real life example:  A very dear friend and scratch golfer has been offering to take his wife and three daughters out to play golf for a number of years.  And the response has been lukewarm at best.  Now all of the women in his life want to learn how to play golf, and they decided to get into the swing of things at the same time!  Explain it?  No way!  But Seth has been leading these ladies down the “golf” path, not pushing them into it. To say he is very excited at their increased level of interest would be an understatement.

OK.  Print this out.  Stick it in your purse or pocket and get started on having some of the greatest times of your life with your Junior Golfer!

Get out there and have fun! – Sam

Getting Started in Junior Golf… Made Easy – part 1

Parenting a Junior Golfer leads to memories that last a lifetime!

Wow, here we’ve been going into a lot of details about what to do to support and encourage your Junior Golfer, but maybe you’re visiting for the first time and hadn’t consider golf as an option for your youngster… Well here’s our first installment of how to start your child in the wonderful, exciting and healthy world of Junior Golf.

This will begin some of the greatest experiences you, your Junior Golfer and all your family will ever have!

Let’s begin:

1.  Does your child have any interest in golf?  How do you know?

  • Start by asking and taking a trip to the range. let them swing at some balls and watch the excitement in his or her eyes.
  • If your child is very young, under 5 years old, buy a set of plastic clubs at a discount store and let them swing at whiffle balls in the yard.
  • If your child seems to have little interest right now, that’s OK.
  • Expose them to some golf:  have them watch golf on TV with you
    • Let them putt on the carpet and again take a couple of swings at the good old whiffle balls…great, inexpensive training aids.
    • It’s kind of like the kiddo who does not want to go fishing, but you take them anyway.  They really are not too interested until someone catches that first fish.  Then they say, “Do you think I could try that?”
    • Promote Positive Exposure without being pushy.
Wood, putter and iron are shown.

Wood, putter and iron are shown. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

2.  Get them some clubs.  Pre-owned children’s/beginner’s sets are readily available.

  • Every golf-related business either has some on hand or knows where you can get some at a very inexpensive price.
  • To get started, your JG needs only a few clubs:  5-iron, 7-iron, 9-iron, pitching wedge, putter and either a 3-wood or 5-wood.
  • U. S Kids Golf makes great clubs for youngsters.
  • As their skills increase, you can upgrade to more clubs and more different types/brands of clubs-skill level compatible.
  • Caution:  make sure the clubs are the correct length for your child.
    •   Clubs that are too long or too short do not give your Junior Golfer much chance of success.
    • Get your child fitted at a major sporting goods store or golf facility.
    • Write down the correct shaft length of the 5-iron that fits your child.
    • While you may be charged for the fitting, you are not obligated to buy clubs from the person that does the fitting.
    • But you do want to buy clubs with a 5-iron that matches the length you wrote down.

3.  Buy a golf bag.  As a rule, buy the lightest bag that their stature allows them to carry.

  • One or two pockets are all they need at this point.
  • Stand bags -the ones with the legs that pop out when you set them down, are super!
  • Buy the size that fits your Junior Golfer, not you.

4.  Buy the best quality golf shoes you can afford.  Top name brands include Adidas, Etonic, Footjoy and Nike among others.

  • Make sure they fit properly.
  • Soft spikes are required on almost every golf course these days
  • Buy a waterproof style if you can afford it.  Wet feet are no fun on the golf course.
  • S3 has worn the Adidas Tour 360 4.0’s for the last 4 years and they are fabulous-a bit pricey, but an excellent value!

5.  Get a glove.  99% of all golfers who wear gloves, wear one on their weak hand.

  • If your Junior Golfer is playing golf right-handed, they would use a glove on their left hand.
  • The best selection of gloves is at the biggest golf stores.
  • If your Junior Golfer needs a Youth or Children’s glove-their hand is smaller than an Adult XS, yes, you need to shop at a big golf store.
  • For the girls, there are a good variety of gloves in very lady-like colors.  Again, go to the bigger golf stores or big sporting goods stores.
  • Gloves serve several purposes:  controlling moisture, controlling grip, helping with feel and with beginners, even stopping the formation of blisters.  And gloves just look good!

Okay, these are the first 5 tips, 5 more to come, we don’t want to overload you… that would be like carrying a full pro’s bag for 18 holes – think of this more as a golf cart version – we want you to enjoy the game, and this blog!

Now get out there and yes… have fun! Sam and Linda

7 Tips for Junior Golf Parents to Finding Your Best Golf Coach

As the parent of a Junior golfer it’s important to release them to the professionals as soon as you can!

Our son, S3, has only had 2 coaches over the last 13 years.  Junior Golf coaches are called, Coaches, Swing Coaches or Instructors, for the most part –as differentiated from Coaches of a particular golf team –a high school or college team, for instance.

S3’s first swing coach was PGA Professional John Clay –a fine instructor, a fine man and a good family friend to this day.  When John moved to a different location, we had to find a new swing coach.  At a summer junior golf skills clinic at Olympia Hills Golf Course, we first met Tim – PGA Professional Tim Harford.  Tim was great with these youngsters, S3 was 7 years-old, I knew we had found our new swing coach.  Tim has been S3’s coach for the last 11 years and the 2 of them have produced great results!

Here are 7 tips to get you started:

1.  Select a PGA Professional Instructor.  In most cases, family and friends are not suited to be your Junior Golfer’s golf coach.  It is better to get proper instruction from the start, than to have your Junior Golfer exposed to some bad habits and having to fix them later.  A PGA Pro is your best choice.

2.  Consider the distance. Your coach probably has a driving range he or she likes to use; the closer they are the easier it will be to fit your practice schedule.  Proximity doesn’t kill the deal in the selection process but it should be a consideration simply for time sake.  I realize that in some cases you have no choice.

3.  Consider his or her track record.

  • Ask for referrals.
  • Ask about the success of their students.
  • How many have placed in or won tournaments?
  • How many are on junior high or high school golf teams?
  • What is their rank on the team?
  • Have any made All-District or been Regional or State qualifiers?
  • Are any attending college on a golf scholarship?

This is a big deal.  You want your Junior Golfer with a successful coach.

4.  Consider the cost.  Here in San Antonio, the price ranges from $25.00 per hour to $100.00+ per hour.   More expensive is not explicitly better; many times you are paying for more than the Pro, it could include range use, overhead costs, and secondary fees.  Usually we get 5-lesson packages from Tim and worked out a discount for range balls to go along with the lessons.  This made for a very reasonably-priced package. Don’t be afraid to ask!

5.  Consider the coach’s temperament. Go watch your candidates give a lesson to a kiddo about your child’s age.  How is the instructor with this age group?  You will see differences, so go watch several lessons by different PGA Pro’s.  Be sure to select a coach who tells the students what to do, rather than one who tells them what not to do.  This is very important.

6.  Consider the coach’s teaching style.

a. How much does the coach talk during the lesson?  We have found that less is better.  You will see some coaches that talk incessantly and give their students a zillion things to remember.  Run the other way!  Your child’s brain is a sponge and if they soak up all that chatter they will be overwhelmed and never get any better.

b. S3’s Coach, Tim, keeps instruction simple and to a minimum.  For the past 11 years we have never seen Tim raise his voice or get angry.  He is soft-spoken and has an amazing knack for giving his students only 2 or 3 things to work on when their lesson is over.  And his students improve their golf game!

7.  Consider the coach’s interaction with your Junior Golfer.  You won’t really know this until you have had a few lessons.

  • Ask your kiddo if they like working with Coach X.  You may be very surprised at the answer if your JG tells you they don’t like this coach, but didn’t want to say anything because it might upset you.  You must ask this question because if your JG doesn’t like the instructor, they won’t learn much, if anything.
  • Does the coach return your calls, texts, or emails promptly?
  • Are they willing to work your child in for a lesson on little or no notice?  If this one won’t, there are plenty that will.

When you find the right coach, you and your Junior Golfer will know it.  You will have made a good and trusted friend.  And you may have two different coaches, one for initial instruction and one for more advanced techniques.

Now, start looking!  Have some fun!! – Sam

Beat the Heat – Junior Golfing Tips – part 2

If you can’t stand the heat… don’t parent a junior golfer!

As you know Mom and Dad, the days of playing junior golf tournaments in 75 degree, blue-bird weather, at least in Texas are few and far between.  Our kiddos more than likely will be playing in high heat in the summer and maybe decent, but chilly weather in the winter.

Okay, here’s the second installment of Beat-the-Heat tips, I pray you have taken advantage of the first set. Let me know how you implemented them with your Junior Golfer.

7.  2 Gloves, at least 2 gloves:  Gloves can get soaked with sweat and your JG needs the comfort of having at least 1 extra glove…probably a total of 3 gloves is best. S3 has worn Nike, TaylorMade, and Titleist gloves over his Junior Golf career. He prefers the leather Nike Elite Feel, but his college teammate, Dakota likes the leather Titleist Player’s glove. Gloves come in synthetic or leather, we prefer leather for overall quality, feel and longevity.

8.  Hats, caps and visors:  Bigger brims provide more protection but if it is windy, bigger can become a hassle.  Beginning JG’s may find bigger hats to be uncomfortable or clumsy. Preference plays a big part in the selection, but getting your JG to be comfortable in a cap, hat, or visor may protect them from suffering heat stroke in extreme weather.

9.  Sunscreen and insect repellent:  We prefer organic sunscreens which stop the burning rays while letting in the beneficial rays.  Be sure to put some sunscreen on your Junior Golfer’s ears, nose, back of the neck and forehead. Warding off those flying no-seeums and mosquitoes is no fun especially during a tournament we use a non-toxic repellent found online at www.mercola.com and FYI we do not receive any monetary benefit from this website.

 10.  Eyeglasses:  If your Junior Golfer wears prescription glasses, just make some provision for them not to slide around on the nose or face during their swing.  Contact lenses may perform better for your Junior Golfer if available, or prescription sunglasses. S3 wears non-prescription sunglasses (Oakley’s) about ½ the time –and frankly I think he plays better without them.  Pay attention to how your Junior Golfer plays with and without shades and offer them your input.

11.  Head-bands, wrist-bands and soaking neck towels:  These are a matter of personal preference…of course, as the boys and girls get older –some items are just “unfashionable”.

12.  Follow the tournament rules:  At the recent San Antonio Junior Matchplay Championship, parents were encouraged to give their Junior Golfer’s something to drink as often as possible –between every hole, if necessary, because of the extreme heat –no coaching of course.  There was a course appointed cart bringing wet towels to the competitors.  The safety of our JG’s is paramount for a day of excellence at the golf course and when parents and spectators are given this latitude of additional contact with the players –parents are expected to display their personal integrity and refrain from coaching. (Linda will give us ‘how to’s’ on this in a later post.)

There you go, 12 tips you can put into practice today to prepare your Junior Golfer to beat-the-heat in style.

The time you spend with your Junior Golfer will be some of the best moments in both your lives!  Preparing for inclement weather puts your Junior Golfer at the top of the playing field, weather-wise, with the other players who are prepared –and at a great advantage over the players who are not properly prepared.

We will be posting future preparation tips for rainy and cold days of play. Until then, get out there and have fun!! – Sam

The Mental Game of Junior Golf: No One is Immune to Pressure!

“the burden of mental or physical distress especially from grief, illness, or adversity”

The pressure is on for parenting junior golfers!

What a great finish to the Greenbriar Classic this past July as Ted Potter, Jr and Troy Kelly, tied after 72-holes, needing 3 playoff holes to decide the winner!  Pressure was taking its toll on many of the half-dozen or so players who had a chance to win going into their final 9 holes. Tour veteran Ken Duke had 2 doubles in a row.  US Open champion Webb Simpson had a string of bogeys.  Even Ted and Troy hit some poor shots during their playoff… pressure never takes a holiday.  Even the pros are not immune to the impact of pressure.

Our junior golfers (JG’s) have endless opportunities to experience pressure:

  • their first tournament,
  • their first tournament in a higher division,
  • the name of the tournament,
  • who is watching,
  • how many are watching,
  • what does today’s score mean for future events,
  • “I am playing terrible…how do I fix it?”,
  • “I am playing great…how do I keep it up?”,
  • “Wow I have never hit this shot before…can I pull it off?”,
  • “This 3-foot putt has my knees knocking!”
  • …and the list goes on and on.

Successfully dealing with pressure is a learned behavior and while some Junior Golfer’s do it better than others…please remember Mom and Dad, no one is immune.  The earlier you and your JG address this issue, the faster their overall game should improve.

English: The British professional golfer Nick ...

Sir Nick Faldo and Ian Baker-Finch were talking about pressure during the closing holes of The Greenbriar Classic.  To paraphrase Sir Nick talking about the pressure mostly on Ted Potter, Jr and Troy Kelly:

You need to be able to recognize that some part of your body or mind is over-revved …too hyped up.  Identify that part and have a brief conversation with it and do something to calm yourself down …take a few deep breaths.

When Sir Nick Faldo and Ian Baker-Finch talk –you certainly want to pay attention.

Your junior golfer is not going to achieve their desired result when their knees are shaking, or their pulse or blood pressure is elevated.  Deep breathing exercises can be helpful:

  • Stand still
  • Take a deep breath and hold it for 5 seconds
  • Let it out slowly
  • Repeat several times
  • Refocus

Parents, we hope this brief introduction to the mental part of your Junior Golfer’s golf game has been helpful.  Please remember that pressure is always there, sometimes more… sometimes less… your Junior Golfer does want to play well for you and of course… they have their competitive spirit… 2 more areas of pressure.

Linda and I are sharing our real-life experiences from the last 10 years with our son Sam III, (S3)’s junior golf career.  We appreciate you joining us on this journey and we hope our successful junior golf experiences will be a foundation for success in your junior golfer.

Now get out there and have some fun! –Sam

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