Posts Tagged ‘Scholastic ineligibility’

Junior Golf: Yes You Can, No You Can’t

In this Friday Flop Shot we will continue our examination of choices and how they impact the people involved in them. This post will be from your junior golfer’s perspective.

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Photocredit:Dubai Golf

There are 2 great lines about choices and I encourage parents to ingrain these lines into your children ASAP. It is not too late or too early, whatever his/her age. Again, for this post these lines are said by Mom and Dad to your youngsters.


Son/daughter, you can choose your actions.
This refers back to the previous post about always having choices and there is always a better choice. Basically, everything any of us do, adults or kiddo’s is a choice we make. We have the freedom to do so.
Son/daughter, you cannot choose the consequences of your actions. Wow, that’s actually quite scary! So, your kiddo can make a choice, but the reality is that he/she will have very little ability control the impact/consequences.

What does this really mean to your junior golfer? Let’s use scholastics. He/she can choose to not study, study a little or study a lot for a test. Yes, the more studying done likely will give better results, but there are no guarantees of an excellent outcome. A good grade can continue scholastic eligibility, while a poor grade could lead to problems and perhaps becoming ineligible to compete.

On the golf course, let’s say your kiddo chooses to hit a “hero” shot out of an undesirable lie, rather than merely chipping the ball back in play in the fairway. Even the pros have trouble hitting a great “hero” shot every time. There are so many unpredictables. So what could happen? A million things! Your son attempts his hero shot and the ball gets stuck in a tree. Or it hits a tree and goes out-of-bounds. Or it hits a tree and goes backwards 70 yards into an even worse lie. Again, the possibilities are endless and there is no way to control the consequences of that swing. Too many unknowns and variables.

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Photocredit:Dissolve

Here’s a real-life example. A young female friend of ours had a guy in her face loudly saying unsavory things and he wouldn’t stop or leave her alone. She got tired of it, slapped him and he called the police. She was arrested and is having to spend thousands of dollars and a lot of time working her way through the legal ramifications of 1 slap that left no mark, no scratch, no bruise. Gosh, that’s a lot of grief for 1 slap to a rude dude. She made the choice to slap, but she had no control over the consequences of such an, at the time at least, seemingly necessary action.

Mom and Dad actions/choices have consequences and more often than not, we have little to no control over them. Better choices do however, tend to result in more desirable consequences.

See you on #1 tee ready to make good choices… Sam

Junior Golf: The First Step To Success

In this Friday Flop Shot we will look at one of the most important things that you must stress to your young golfer in order to help them achieve junior golf success.

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Photocredit:Dubai Golf

This idea was always first in our house. Yes, even ahead of playing golf. Without this factor your child is limited in all areas of positive achievement. What on earth are we talking about here?

Let’s call it high standards. What does this look like? Well, many things come into play. A desire to compete, a desire to excel and wanting to get good grades on schoolwork are good examples. With discipline, structure and solid parental guidance these things are all possible.

Parents of kiddos 7 years old and younger may be wondering exactly why this is important. Why can’t your child just go to school and be a kid? Well, he/she certainly can, but things will be much better if you decide to pursue the suggestions we’re offering today.

Everything we’re talking about here translates directly into the world of golf, both practice and play. Without a good mental approach your youngster is at a distinct disadvantage.

Here’s where it gets very serious. No pass/no play is a reality in high school and college golf. Your son/daughter must be scholastically eligible to play in competition, period. There are no exceptions. There are minimum number of classes/hours and a minimum GPA that must be maintained. Start preparing your child for this situation now.

Once a golfer is scholastically ineligible there is a waiting period before they can regain their eligibility. This time varies depending on the structure of grading and grading periods at individual high schools and universities. It might be as short as a week or 2 or it could be 4 or 5 weeks. In every instance, no one is happy about it.

The coach is not pleased. The teammates while supportive, usually, of their ineligible team member, feel let down. Your child should be unhappy with him/herself. The lack of discipline, desire for excellence, respect for the game and respect for their teammates should hopefully be an encouragement to square those shoulders and start producing better grades.

It’s bad enough in high school where the consequences are basically embarrassment, letting down the coach and teammates and missing some tournaments, but it’s really bad in college where your son/daughter is being paid to play golf.

Too much scholastic irresponsibility and your golfer might be kicked off the college team. It happens! So now you and your student have this nightmare and your college out-of-pocket dollars have dramatically increased. Time for a big time pow-wow!

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S3 was eligible for every event in high school and college. He missed a couple of events due to injury and one due to a poor qualifying round. But his grades were always good! There was actually more scholastic failure among his high school team members, than with his college ones. I feel this is generally due to an increased maturity level among college golfers.

Mom and Dad these are life lessons which are timeless and are helpful in every part of your kiddo’s future. Please consider finding some ways to incorporate some of these suggestions into your son’s/daughter’s everyday routine.

See you on #1 tee looking disciplined… Sam

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