Posts Tagged ‘Sleep deprivation’

Junior Golf: Do This For Back-To-School Success

In this Monday Mulligan we will show you a very important thing to do that will set

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Photocredit:jennleforge.com

your junior golfer up for back-to-school and athletic success.

 

What are we talking about here? Well, it’s one thing that totally crosses over and directly impacts all aspects of your youngster’s life, including academically and athletically. What is it?

Ok, we’re talking about quantity and quantity of sleep. A huge percentage of the world’s population from infants to old folks are not getting enough quality sleep. This impacts every aspect of daily performance. Grades and golf are seriously affected.

Summer sleep patterns are often very different from school-year sleep routines and now is the perfect time to implement sleep schedules and environments designed for maximum benefit in school and on the golf course. See the chart below for recommended sleeping times by age group.

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In addition to getting enough sleep, there needs to be a high quality of sleep.

Here are some things we do in our house:
Best sleep is when the temperature is below 70-degrees F.
We turn down the thermostat at night.

Down time is a must to let your kiddo’s brain unwind. S3 began his downtime 1.5 hours prior to lights out. He still does this today.
Sleep in total darkness. Heavy drapes and shades will help. The room needs to be as close to completely dark as possible.
Keep all electronic devices like radios, cell phones, alarm clocks, etc at least 6 feet from your child’s head. Their emissions are disruptive to quality sleep.
Turn off the tv and/or radio before going to sleep. For those youngsters who like to fall asleep with these items turned on, their brain locks onto the content subconsciously and impedes good sleep, not beneficial at all.

If your golfer insists on noise, get an app with babbling brook or splashing surf/calming environmental sounds. Or turn on a small fan with a noticeable hum, making sure it is at least 6 feet from the head of the bed.

No sugar or caffeine within 3 hours of bedtime.

There are a number of additional steps that you can implement, but these will get you off to a great start! There is no substitute for enough high-quality sleep!

See you on #1 tee wide awake and well-rested… Sam

 

 

Junior Golf: 5 Tips For Better Sleep

In today’s Wednesday Waggle we will continue our look at the serious importance of quality sleep and how to set your daughter and the rest of the family up with the best possibility of having a restful night’s sleep.img_0102

We’re offering 5 tips today and while there are more steps that can help with good sleep, these will get you off to a great start. Oh, and we’re not even talking about diet and food today! (Dufner photo golfdigest.com)

Cooler room equals better sleep. This has been known for many years and we put high importance on the temperature in our house. A solid rule of thumb is the best sleep occurs when the bedroom is 70-degrees F or below. Please, before you mention your utility bill, understand that we live in Texas and it’s hot more often than not. We consciously budget the increase in our electric bill to have our thermostat at 70 degrees several hours before bedtime and keep it there overnight. When we do need our heater, it’s set at 65-degrees so we wear more clothes. For many folks this is a budgeting issue. Please consider that good sleep, which means better health, is not cheap, but is doable with proper planning.

The bedroom should be dark, dark and dark. Ambient light of any kind can be detected by the subconscious and disrupt sleep. Also NO blue light numbers on clocks or electronic devices. Only red numerals are allowed.

No electronic devices within 3 feet of your/your daughter’s head. This includes everything, cell phones, iPads, radios, TVs, clocks, etc. The emissions from these items are not conducive to quality sleep. Do NOT let anyone fall asleep with the radio or TV on. The mind locks into the songs or programming and does not allow a good night’s sleep.

No adrenaline-producing activities within 2 hours of bedtime. This would include playing video games, watching/reading exciting shows or books, no office work/homework, and so on. You get my point. Winding down before going to bed is what we are striving for.

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Engage in regular exercise. This is likely not an issue with your junior golfer, but it may be with the rest of the family. Be certain to end all exercise, particularly strenuous exercise, at least 3 hours prior to bedtime. Make exercise a habit. Get into the structure of regular exercise and you will start seeing some sleep benefits in a month or so. And outside exercise where you can get some vitamin D is exceptionally good! Exercise is extremely important for everyone! (photo Omni Hotels)

The overriding principle here is that the bedroom should be a sanctuary, a place of peace and rest. Treat it as such. Help your daughter and the whole family incorporate habits that will help lead to a wonderful night’s sleep.

See you on #1 tee looking very well rested… Sam

Junior Golf: Better Sleep/Better Golf

In this Monday Mulligan we will look at how lack of enough quality sleep negatively impacts your son. Sleep deprivation and poor quality of sleep are widespread health issues among all ages all over the world. The facts are that better sleep equals better golf, better student and better overall health.image

In today’s fast-paced and exciting world it’s common to run across someone who wants to get by with 3 or 4 hours of sleep. They love life and have so many things they want to enjoy! Well, the studies show that only a very small percentage of the population can perform well on minimal sleep, usually meaning averaging less than 8 hours per night and I’ll tell you right now, it’s highly unlikely anyone in your family is included in this minuscule group. (photo jennleforge.com)

While the hours of sleep necessary can vary from infants to
pre-teens to teens to adults, a solid starting point is basically 8 to 9 hours of good sleep per night. Certainly right now some of you are saying, “No way! I don’t see that happening in our house.” (photo Trovati Faceplant Dreams)

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May I offer some data? Sleep deprivation may be associated with poor athletic performance, poor grades, decreased ability to learn and create, slowed reaction time, increased risk of depression, increased susceptibility to any number of health issues including diabetes, weight gain and blood pressure issues, a reduced ability to control emotions and responses and many many more. Folks this is real! (photo Phoenix, Tucson, Arizona golf images)

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Where do Mom and Dad start? Modifying your own sleep habits sets a good example. Your junior golfer will more likely do what you do and your proper example sets the standard for the whole family. Schedule a brief family meeting to review the new sleep times and how all will benefit. Be excited about it! Enough beneficial sleep is every bit as important as clean water, healthy food and exercise. It’s a big deal!

Back out the necessary times. When does everyone need to get up? If it’s 7:00am, have the kids in bed by 10:00pm for 9 hours of sleep. Grade schoolers were in bed by 8:30pm in our house and we worked our way up to 10:00pm for high school. Younger kids need more sleep. Parents, you’ll benefit too.

See you on #1 tee wide awake and rested… Sam

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