Posts Tagged ‘time management’

Junior Golf: 3 Steps To Plan 2017

In this Friday Flop Shot we are going to help you get your junior golfer’s new year off to a good start by using 3 easy steps to plan 2017. (photo offcoursegolf.com)img_0106-1

It is essential to have a plan so you can set goals. Without a plan you are operating on the whim, off the cuff and this is not desirable. All kids need boundaries, in this case it’s structure for the new year in regards to junior golf.

Step 1: have a family meeting. Include everybody. While we are focusing on your junior golfer, the other family members have scheduling needs too and this includes the other at-home kids, if any, and yes Dad and Mom. All these schedules must be coordinated. Ask everyone to bring up the obligations they are currently aware of and write them down in calendar order starting with January 2017. This would include school, extra-curricular events, tournaments, spring break, Holidays, church and anything else whether it occurs once or every week. You are making a Master Calendar.

Step 2: prioritize the events. In our house, grades always came first so school and homework would be high priorities, followed by tournaments. S3 was immersed in golf, aiming for a college scholarship, so he entered every tournament our budget would allow. 1 summer, I think he played in 23 days of tournaments from the end of May until the middle of August. It was fun, but we had to budget well in advance for it. How you prioritize is specific to your family, but you must do it because some of the lower priority items will be cut from the calendar. Your family can’t do everything, but you can do more than you previously thought with good planning. image

Step3: set up a budget and a golf budget would be a sub-category. Frankly once you really get into the junior golf program you will likely find that there are more tournaments, clinics, summer golf camps, golf this, golf that, and there’s just no way to do them all because pretty much no one has both the time and the money to pull all these functions off. We always left some room in our budget. In other words we didn’t budget every dime, we held some money back for special circumstances. Maybe you learn about a new amazing tournament that wasn’t in your plans. Now you have some extra money to take a look at it. Always try to have some funds in reserve. You don’t have to spend it, but it’s there if you need it. And I’m talking about the junior golf category within your total family budget. (image 24-7Calendars.com)

See you on #1 tee looking organized… Sam

Junior Golf : More No Pass No Play

imageIn today’s Wednesday Waggle we will take a look at some aspects of no pass no play that are not so obvious. To restate from my previous post, time management for your junior golfer is a big deal and the sooner you get your daughter on a solid time management structure or at least starting the process, the better off she will be. (photo golfdigest.com)

We are in Texas and npnp is a reality for our kids. It may not be in your state, but now is the time to find out. Just call any high school, ask almost any public school teacher or coach or athletic department. If it is not required in your state, act like it is. Putting grades first is a big deal and while playing in competition should not be promoted as a reward for decent grades, in reality it is. And npnp is in effect in all colleges, at least NCAA affiliates. This is a lifetime skill. Proper time management and prioritization are vital to your daughter’s success.

Homeschool kids in Texas have a unique situation and 1 which I am not totally clear on. Some public schools can now allow some homeschoolers within their school district geography to participate in varsity sports. I think this is great! What I am not clear on is how homeschooled kids are held accountable for making npnp grades. There must be something for it to be fair to regular public school students, who have a gpa standard to meet. The opportunity for homeschooled kids to play varsity sports at public school is wonderful and I am proud of my state for allowing this. Again check this out with a public school district before you get too excited. I just heard about this a few days ago and I think this is a very new law.

Here’s a perfect example of why grades matter. Let’s say there are 10 girls on your daughter’s high school golf team. And your daughter is consistently 1 of the top 3 players and there are really only 4 girls, including your daughter who can play competitively in tournaments. Now if 1 of the 6 girls who do not play at a high skill level ends up being scholastically ineligible, it’s sad, but not likely to impact the team’s results in a tournament.

Here’s why. In high school and in college tournaments 5 people on each team play and the low 4 scores are the ones that count. So the high score is not used. Out of 71, 73, 75, 76 and 85, the 85 does not count and the total for that round would be 295. 1 player on your daughter’s team can have a poor round. Now if your daughter or 1 of the other top girls doesn’t make her grades, her team has little chance of being competitive. One of the lesser-skilled girls would need to have a great round, which can and does happen but cannot be counted on. So if your daughter does not keep her gpa up she is letting down the team and frankly, really it is not good and can and will be interpreted by some as being a selfish act, being lazy about grades. Sure there can be a course or teacher that is just really a pain, but tutors are available and sometimes your daughter will need to spend extra effort on her gpa in addition to her golf. Yes, time management.

To keep priorities straight, in high school S3 almost always had 1 or more kids ineligible all the time, both guys and girls. Frankly these were usually kids who were lazy about golf and apparently lazy about grades too. Now in 3.5 years, 7 semesters of college golf at an NCAA Division II school, I think he has had maybe 1 guy and 1 girl scholastically ineligible for 1 grading period, total.image

To be clear S3 has always been scholastically eligible and it is a tiebreaker point when you put on your resume to college coaches that you, rather, your daughter has always been scholastically eligible throughout her high school career. Mom and Dad, colleges want daughters and sons who will make their grades, period. And my little, personal survey is a decent example. College student-athletes, for the most part are motivated and are going to have good grades. Set your daughter up to succeed and get good time management habits started today.

See you on #1 tee looking timely and organized… Sam

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